“A House Without a Porch Is Boring” Lunch and Learn Lecture Coming May 11

Porch

Celebrate National Preservation Month this May with a look at a uniquely American staple of architecture, the porch. Sandra Bosley, Executive Director of Preservation of Historic Winchester, will take you through a journey discussing the origins of the porch, how a porch can give clues about the architectural style of a house, and some of the social and cultural movements surrounding porches which made them an integral part of American homes. Bring a lunch and learn with us!

Date: Thursday, May 11, 2017
Time: Noon-1 PM
Place: OakCrest Companies, 126 N. Kent St., Winchester, VA
RSVP: Appreciated but not required
Cost: Free and open to the public
Parking: Parking is limited and on-street parking is metered; we recommend utilizing the George Washington Autopark, across the street from OakCrest.
Questions? Contact PHW at phwinc.org@gmail.com or 540-667-3577.

Friday Photos: Bough and Dough Shop 1997

Happy Friday! Before we get to the photos, mark your calendars for our Preservation Month Lunch and Learn Lecture “A House Without a Porch Is Boring,” coming on May 11, noon, at OakCrest, 126 N. Kent St. We’ll have more details on the presentation available soon.

This week, we found a few more images from the 1997 Holiday House Tour in the files. Brand new are 25 photos taken of the table setups at the Bough and Dough Shop in the Cannonball Restaurant, 229 South Loudoun Street. The Saturday of the Shop that year coincided with the first limited opening of the restaurant. The Shop was set up in the dining booths, while the bar area served lunch to promote the new restaurant. The Shop featured twenty vendors that year, most of which were documented in the photos. Not pictured were the greens, centerpieces, and wreaths by Cheryl Crowell, Evergreen Tree Farm, James Wood Agriculture Department, and handmade jewelery by Mary Teer. We also found a second photo album from the 1997 Tour with duplicate photographs, which verified some very early uploads in our Flickr account were from the 1997 House Tour at the Red Lion Tavern. Those photos, plus the new Shop photos, have been added to the 1997 Holiday House Tour album. Happy viewing!

Bough and Dough Shop 1997

Watch the Log Structure Maintenance & Repairs Lecture Now


Did you miss the November Lunch and Learn lecture Log Structure Maintenance & Repairs, or want to revisit the information? We have posted a podcast-style version of the presentation by Moss Rudley on our YouTube channel. The presentation is just a little over one hour in length. While we were not able to use the matching images, we hope you still find the audio portion of the lecture worthwhile and useful.

Reminder: Fort Loudoun Walk and Learn Next Thursday!

LecturesNorman Baker of the French and Indian War Foundation will lead a tour of the site of Winchester’s Fort Loudoun on Thursday, November 10 at noon, weather permitting. The walking tour of the area once covered by the fort will last one hour, with time after for questions for those who can stay longer. On-street parking is limited, but parking is available at the nearby Loudoun Street Autopark.

Meet at noon at 419 North Loudoun Street, Winchester, VA. The event is free and open to the public.

Dress for the weather and wear comfortable walking shoes for the tour. For questions and RSVPs, please call 540-667-3577 or email phwinc.org@gmail.com.

Reminder: Log Structure Maintenance and Repairs

Lectures Please join us next Thursday for the fall Lunch and Learn Lecture Log Structure Maintenance and Repairs. Moss Rudley, Acting Superintendent of the National Park Service Historic Preservation Training Center in Frederick, Maryland, presents this much-requested topic on maintaining and repairing our historic log structures. Bring a lunch and learn with us!

Date: November 3, 2016
Time: Noon-1 PM
Place: OakCrest Companies, 126 N. Kent St., Winchester, VA
RSVP: Appreciated but not required
Cost: Free and open to the public
Questions? Contact PHW at phwinc.org@gmail.com or 540-667-3577.

Parking is limited and on-street parking is metered; we recommend utilizing the George Washington Autopark, across the street from OakCrest.

Reminder: Hopewell Meeting House Tour Tomorrow!

Lectures Please join us for our first Walk and Learn tour on Saturday, October 22. Jim Riley will lead a tour of the area’s oldest Quaker Meeting House. Learn the background on the Quakers and the history of the Hopewell Meeting house site. Weather permitting, the tour will include an outdoor component. The event is expected to last 1 to 1.5 hours. Water will be available.

Meet at Hopewell Meeting House, 604 Hopewell Road, Clear Brook, VA at 11 AM. The event is free and open to the public.

Coming Soon: Walk and Learn Lectures!

Lectures Introducing a new spin on the Lunch and Learn series…Walk and Learn!

This fall, PHW has lined up two on site visits for a more hands-on learning experience. First, on Saturday, October 22, Jim Riley will lead a Saturday tour of the area’s oldest Quaker Meeting House. Learn the background on the Quakers and the history of the Hopewell Meeting house site. Weather permitting, the tour will include an outdoor component. The event is expected to last 1 to 1.5 hours. Water will be available.

Meet at Hopewell Meeting House, 604 Hopewell Road, Clear Brook, VA at 11 AM. The event is free and open to the public.

Second, Norman Baker of the French and Indian War Foundation will lead a tour of the site of Winchester’s Fort Loudoun on Thursday, November 10 at noon, weather permitting. The walking tour of the area once covered by the fort will last one hour, with time after for questions for those who can stay longer. On-street parking is limited, but parking is available at the nearby Loudoun Street Autopark.

Meet at noon at 419 North Loudoun Street, Winchester, VA. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP your attendance for this tour by November 3 to PHW at 540-667-3577 or phwinc.org@gmail.com.

Dress for the weather and wear comfortable walking shoes for both tours. For questions and RSVPs, please call 540-667-3577 or email phwinc.org@gmail.com.

Friday Photos: A Loudoun Street Miscellany

Happy Friday! First, thank you to those who have dropped off some plastic shopping bags for the Bough and Dough Shop. Please keep them coming! We will try to collect as many as we can before December, and any that are not used this year will be saved for future events.

Call for SponsorsSecond, this is a friendly reminder that we are about one month out from the deadline for Holiday House Tour advertising sponsors in our program booklet. This year, we are extremely grateful to have a team of business majors from Shenandoah University helping us make contact with sponsors as part of their classwork. If you are contacted by students for advertising opportunities, please know they are doing it with the blessing of PHW, and if any questions arise, we are happy to talk to you here at the PHW office.

Third, for those anxiously awaiting some word on the fall Lunch and Learn lectures, save the dates of October 22 and November 3. We are working on a special Saturday site visit to Hopewell Meeting House and a regular lunchtime program on log building maintenance, with two additional program dates pending.

Fourth, on to the photos! This week, PHW added about 50 images to the Flickr account, the majority of which are on Loudoun Street – North, South, and the Walking Mall. Of particular interest may be some photos that fell out of the Red Lion Tavern informational files. As you may know, there was previously a marble yard and small wooden shop building on Cork Street operated by the owners of the Red Lion Tavern. While we have photographic documentation of the Valley Marble Works/Haines’ Memorials building before it was demolished, Ben Ritter found a receipt from 1857 with a drawing the the building and donated two photos of it to PHW in 1995.
Valley Marble Works Receipt
Catch all the new images at the top of the Flickr photostream.

Around the Internet: Email, Lunch and Learn Lecture, Never Built Winchester

Around the Internet First, a reminder: The PHW email is changing! If you have not already, be sure to update us in your address books to phwinc.org@gmail.com. We may be able to access the Verizon email for just a week or so longer.

Next, we have a much-delayed Lunch and Learn lecture video to share with you. The timeliness of the presentation may have passed, but we wanted to provide as best a record of the event as we could. The presentation covers Tim Youman’s October 22, 2015 two-part lecture on “Expansion of the Winchester National Register Historic District” and “National Avenue Corridor Enhancement District.” The Historic District expansion portion is at the beginning of the presentation. If you prefer to skip ahead to the National Avenue Corridor Enhancement District portion of the talk, that starts at approximately the 31 minute mark. Listen to the video below or directly on YouTube.

Last for this week, an interesting counterpoint to our Vanished Winchester series – “Never Built Winchester.” Many people are taken with the map hanging above the fireplace in Sandra Bosley’s office at the Hexagon House. The map, donated to us by Lee Taylor, shows planned improvements to Winchester as part of Judge Handley’s efforts to better the town. The developments never materialized, but it is fascinating to see how the town could have grown. If you’ve wanted to look at this map at your own leisure, the Archives at the Library of Virginia featured the map at their blog, Out of the Box.

The Library of Virginia notes only one building from the project was completed – Hotel Winchester as per the map, Winchester Inn as it was more commonly called. As many of you know from our work on Vanished Winchester, the Inn was demolished about 1919 and the spacious property subdivided into a housing development. For a brief history of the Winchester Inn and its relationship to Winchester’s railroads, watch the clip on YouTube from about 3:43 to 6:30 in Sandra Bosley’s presentation “Images and History of Architecture and Industry Along Winchester’s Railroads.”

Winchester Inn 1904